Tag Archives: procrastination

Procrastination Nation

 

-Marissa Tomko

I bet you’re doing it right now. Yeah, you. I bet you’ve been up all night with an assignment you’ve been dangerously close to finishing for hours. You could have gone to bed at midnight, but instead you watched a bunch of YouTube videos and Snapchatted your friends pictures of your coffee at 3 a.m. with the caption “I HATE MY LIFE!!!!” Now, the sun is starting to peek over the horizon, and you’ve found yourself here. You have two pages left on that research paper, and yet you’re catching up on your email, current affairs, and of course, The Pulse.

Ah, procrastination. A delay by any other name would leave an assignment just as incomplete! Okay, enough with the jokes. Procrastination is real life. I’ve been doing it since I can remember; I can never bring myself to do something until I absolutely have to get it done. As far as the end results go, I’ve never had a serious problem—I get good grades, my expired driver’s license was never an issue, and I am perfectly content eating Saltine PB&J’s when I should have gone grocery shopping two weeks before.

Psychology Today distinguishes three types of procrastinators: the arousal types who procrastinate for the exhilaration, the avoiders who fear failure (or even success) because they care about other people’s opinions of their work, and decisional procrastinators who can’t make decisions and consequently attempt to acquit themselves of responsibility by simply not deciding. All procrastinators make excuses, with the most noted being “I work better under pressure.” In an article for the BBC, Rowan Pelling discredits this excuse, citing research that suggests procrastinators both complicate and shorten their lives.

“Procrastinators are less wealthy, less healthy and less happy than those who don’t delay,” she writes.

I have never considered my procrastination as being anything more than an annoying quirk. It was not until recently that I realized my habit has lessened the quality of my life and the opinions that people have of me. Last week, I was called out by one of my best friends for using the excuse of “I’m just spacey and put off studying” one too many times. I had to back out of plans to study for a test that I had been avoiding the reality of up until the penultimate day. My friend’s outburst at me got me thinking: I can never hang out with friends during the week because I am too busy scrambling to get things done for the next day. I don’t remember the last time I was able to make a big spontaneous commitment, like hiking Spencer’s Butte or taking a last minute coast trip. Procrastination makes me feel especially crazed—my relationships have suffered, and I feel a constant guilt because of it.

My friend made me realize that I have two choices: I can join Procrastinators Anonymous, or I can remember what it’s like to feel carefree and have the respect of my friends. Because of his wake-up call, I can already feel a brighter school term ahead!

Image by Rennett Stowe.

Fighting Senioritis

-Casey Klekas

As my college experience nears its end, I’ve come down with a bad case of senioritis. This ailment has caused my creative faculties to dry up at a time when I need them more than ever. I feel like it’s the fourth quarter and I don’t have the energy to finish strong. I’ve found a few ways to combat this condition so as to relight my imagination before it burns out completely.

The best defense against senioritis, I think, is to take time to read for pleasure. I always carry a book with me–one that isn’t on a syllabus–just in case I have a free moment when I need to recharge rather than zone out. This goes double for writers. Being a good reader is essential for being a good writer. I find that when I’ve spent the whole day buried in unabsorbing texts with big words that have little relevance to my daily routine, it’s hard to make the transition to writing well.

I know that whenever I’ve been reading a lot of a particular author, I tend to write much like his or her style. Sometimes I do this deliberately. For example, when I need to write a short essay, I warm up by reading George Orwell. When I feel my writing style has become dull or flat, I’ll flip through a random passage of Nabokov to refresh my love of the English language. I’ve heard several of my favorite authors, including Hunter S. Thompson, say that they learned to write by copying whole texts from the writers they most admired (in his case, it was Fitzgerald and Mailer). If this seems excessive, then just read them carefully.

When reading, if you’re not buzzing with caffeine shakes, you should be sitting straight in a not-too-comfortable chair, in a well-lit, quiet room. I don’t think the same needs to be said for writing because sometimes it’s easier for me to write if there is a white noise overlaid with music in the background.

Whatever the case for reading and writing, the best antidote to senioritis is to recharge your imagination. Boredom is a very serious disease. It stifles creativity and it must be overcome if one wants to create anything interesting. So, now that finals week has come and gone, don’t spend your very short periods of free time zoning out on YouTube or Netflix. Pick up a good book, and keep your creativity candle lit and your imaginative skills burning.

Flux Playlist: Procrastination

-Flux Blog Staff

Procrastination. We’re all guilty of it. We’ve all had those late nights when we spend hours on Youtube instead of studying for our midterms and finals. Those endless evenings when we camp out in the Knight Library only to put on our Sherlock Holmes hats to become Facebook detectives. We’ve all been there, and we all know how much it sucks. So we here at the Flux blog decided to give a shout out to the weekend warriors who were partying when they should’ve been hitting the books. We probably would have had this playlist up sooner, but we kind of put it together at the last minute.


Get a playlist! Standalone player Get Ringtones

 

Mike

  • Time is Running Out -Muse
  • Who Cares? -Gnarls Barkley
  • White Blank Page -Mumford and Sons

Tamara

  • Under Pressure -Queen ft. David Bowie
  • Trying to Find a Balance -Atmosphere
  • Sitting, Waiting, Wishing -Jack Johnson

Callie

  • Paradise -Coldplay
  • Lucky -Jason Mraz ft. Colbie Caillat

Tiana

  • I Hate College -Samuel Adams
  • Young, Wild and Free -Wiz Khalifa ft. Snoop Dogg
  •  Billionaire -Travie McCoy ft. Bruno Mars

Sam

  • The Lazy Song -Bruno Mars
  • Handlebars -Flobots
  • Threw it on the Ground -The Lonely Island

Jessica

  • Waste -Foster the People
  • Teenage Dirtbag -Wheatus
  • We’re Going to be Friends -The White Stripes

How to Avoid Procrastination

-Callie Gisler

Procrastination. One dangerous little word that college students know all too well. It comes in the form of Facebook, Twitter, television, cell phones, chatty roommates, nights out, and unexpected naps. But between midterms, group projects, and the end of a term looming, procrastinating on work can be deadly.

How can you beat the habit now and save yourself the trouble later? Here are just a few ideas to beat the procrastination bug:

Organize yourself. Staying organized can help you beat the temptation to slack off. Developing a personal fetish for calendars, to-do lists and sticky-notes can help you keep track of what you have to do.

Make a game plan for your work and stick to it! For larger projects, divide out tasks over several days to avoid cramming, sacrificing your sanity and the quality of your effort.

Technology can help you, believe it or not. Mac users, check out the Self Control App that is free to download on your computer. It allows you to block certain websites (Facebook and Twitter, for example) for a set amount of time so you can focus on your work. For PC users, Cold Turkey does the same thing.

Recruit your friend or roommate. Sometimes it’s easier to keep yourself accountable when you have someone else holding you to it, even if means asking a roommate you babysit you while you write an essay. Ask a friend to keep you away from Facebook and off your phone so you can keep working on the things that need to be done.

Or spend your work time with someone who inspires you to be productive. We all have that friend who can turn the outside world off and get things done. Take a lesson and join him or her for a study session.

Change locations. Sometimes it helps to mix up your study or work local. Leave the house and go check out that coffee shop around the corner. Or take a trip to the library – you know, that place you haven’t visited since freshman year.

Set aside a block of time during the day to get things done. Give yourself two hours in the evening after you get home from classes. Or set your alarm an hour early and work before you head out for the day. Once you have your time scheduled, sit down, turn off the cell phone, and focus on your work.

Follow Callie at @calliegisler

The 5 W's of Google

-Elliott Kennedy

Online procrastination is the leading cause of marginal grades and failed study sessions in the United States. It leads to unfinished papers, abandoned textbooks, and partial projects. How many times have you started studying for an exam, only to magically end up browsing the wall of your Facebook page? How many times have you started writing an essay, but soon find yourself Tweeting about this f&*%! assignment instead?

And now there’s yet another way to wile away the hours.

Think back to your elementary school days, with spelling tests and model planets, and personal narratives that included the five W’s: who, what, where, when, why. And how. When you type one of these words into your web browser, a drop-down menu appears with top hits… but have you ever looked at these options? I mean, really looked at them? Some are funny. Some make you question the current state of the American education system. But all of them will make you laugh and give you welcome relief from the drudgery of homework.

Here are a few top hits from my own adventures with the Five W’s of Google.

Who:

  • Who un-followed me
  • Who wants to be a millionaire
  • Who v. whom
  • Who sampled
  • Who invented the internet

What:

  • What does my name mean
  • What is occupy wall street
  • What time is it
  • What is planking
  • What does SMH mean

Where:

  • Where’s George
  • Where is Chuck Norris
  • Where’s Waldo
  • Where them girls at
  • Where the wild things are
  • Where is my mind

When:

  • When is Halloween
  • When parents text
  • When to use a semi-colon
  • When to harvest hops
  • When to work

Why:

  • Why is the sky blue
  • Why do cats purr
  • Why are manhole covers round
  • Why do men cheat
  • Why not zoidberg

How:

  • How to tie a tie
  • How to write a cover letter
  • How to hard boil eggs
  • How much should I weigh
  • How to cook quinoa

Or better yet, how will you get back to studying now that you’re most likely redirecting the browser to try the Five W’s of Google on your own computer?

 

 

Online procrastination is the leading cause of marginal grades and failed study sessions in the United States. It leads to unfinished papers, abandoned textbooks, and partial projects. How many times have you started studying for an exam, only to magically end up browsing the wall of your Facebook page? How many times have you started writing an essay, but soon find yourself Tweeting about this f&*%! assignment instead?

And now there’s yet another way to wile away the hours.

Think back to your elementary school days, with spelling tests and model planets, and personal narratives that included the five W’s: who, what, where, when, why. And how. When you type one of these words into your web browser, a drop-down menu appears with top hits… but have you ever looked at these options? I mean, really looked at them? Some are funny. Some make you question the current state of the American education system. But all of them will make you laugh and give you welcome relief from the drudgery of homework.

Here are a few top hits from my own adventures with the Five W’s of Google.

Who:

  • Who un-followed me
  • Who wants to be a millionaire
  • Who v. whom
  • Who sampled
  • Who invented the internet

What:

  • What does my name mean
  • What is occupy wall street
  • What time is it
  • What is planking
  • What does SMH mean

Where:

  • Where’s George
  • Where is Chuck Norris
  • Where’s Waldo
  • Where them girls at
  • Where the wild things are
  • Where is my mind

When:

  • When is Halloween
  • When parents text
  • When to use a semi-colon
  • When to harvest hops
  • When to work

Why:

  • Why is the sky blue
  • Why do cats purr
  • Why are manhole covers round
  • Why do men cheat
  • Why not zoidberg
  • Why

How:

  • How to tie a tie
  • How to write a cover letter
  • How to hard boil eggs
  • How much should I weigh
  • How to cook quinoa

Or better yet, how will you get back to studying now that you’re most likely redirecting the browser to try the Five W’s of Google on your own computer?