Tag Archives: Google

My Top 5 Favorite Google Logo Manipulations

-Sam Bouchat

When I woke up on Mother’s day and called my mum, the first thing she said was, “Have you seen the Google logo for today? It’s adorable!”

Recalling how Google’s animated logos used to celebrate holidays and special occasions had impressed me in the past, I rushed to my computer, and was not disappointed. In fact, I was so not disappointed that the 2012 Mother’s Day Google logo has earned a place on my top five favorite Google logos. Wanna hear them all? Of course you do. Let’s get started!

5. Les Paul’s 96th Birthday

This interactive logo allowed you to strum a Google shaped guitar and record and save your amateur music. Sure, it didn’t create any masterpieces, but it was super fun.

4. 30th Anniversary of PAC-MAN

Play Pac-Man on a field unlike any Pac-Man field you’ve seen before! Run away from ghosts around “Google” and grab the cherries. Best of all, it even includes the signature “waka-waka,” and saves your high score!

3. Mother’s Day 2012

This logo is simple and adorable. Two ‘o’s run out to tackle the lower case ‘g’ in a hug, as it is obvious that the ‘g’ is their mom. They give her a flower, hug, and the animation ends.

2. Martha Graham’s 117th Birthday

This logo is simply beautiful. It celebrates revolutionary dancer Martha Graham, who created and evolved the field of dance. Five of the moves that she invented are displayed in the logo in an elegant animation. The story behind the logo is much more involved, making it easy to appreciate the research that went into making it.

1. Freddie Mercury’s 65th Birthday

I loved this logo not just for the superb music, but also the animation. It gives a fine salute to one of Britain’s greatest musicians. If anyone should be riding flying tigers and shooting aliens in space, it’s Mr. Mercury.

How to Find a New Place to Live: A Guide for the Clueless

-Sam Bouchat

That time of year has come around—it’s time to reserve your fall living situation. This will be my fourth time moving in as many years, and through hardship, annoyances, and difficultly learned lessons, I have become something of an expert at finding new places to live. Here is a simple guide to make finding your next home less stressful.

1. Determine Your Priorities

Every person has different needs in a living situation. For me, I don’t mind a long commute to campus; but I cannot, under any circumstances, live in a loud environment. Quiet and tranquility (along with price) are my highest priorities. As such, this limits my living arrangement options—this is both a good and a bad thing. It’s good because I can narrow down where I want to live (areas around frats are out of the question), but bad because it gives me less options to choose from. You must figure out what is important to you, and use that structure when finding places you want to live.

2. Research Your Landlords

Utilize websites like Yelp and Google reviews to determine if your future property manager is responsible or god-awful. For instance, there must be a reason Von Klein Property Management has 17 reviews on Google, every single one of which is 1 star. But you don’t have to stop at the internet.

When I was living in my sophomore quarters, the landlord showed my place while I was there. The entire time, I was astounded that the groups to whom the place was being shown did not once ask us, the current tenants, about the rental. Talk to people who live there! You will never get a more honest opinion. And people LOVE to talk about their homes.

3. Read the Fine Print

READ. THE. LEASE. The whole lease. Every last word. Because you might end up being screwed, and you would have been warned if you had just read that last, 8 point clause. Ask questions about everything. What does “common area” imply? Who do I call for noise complaints? What’s the emergency number?

And make copies of EVERYTHING. Your lease, your checks. Write down who you talked with on the phone that promised that August rent would be half off. Keep documents, because they might be the only thing between you and a miserable year.

4. Talk to Friends

Your friends have great and awful living experiences—ask them for advice. Oh, you love where you live? How do I apply? Oh, your landlord never came to fix your dryer? I’ll be sure to avoid him.

5. Start Early

Don’t wait until the last minute to begin looking for and applying for fall apartments or houses. You’ll end up with the dregs. Find a place that you love now, and cut your stressing short. You’ll be thankful come September.

The Pillow with a Heartbeat

-Laura Lundberg

College is a time where individuals begin to grow, find what they want to do in life, and become a different person than they were in high school. Sometimes high school sweethearts fade away, and sometimes they stay. However, one of the hardest things for high school couples entering college (or are still together while in college) is a long distance relationship.

Long distance relationships are difficult, and they require just as much maintenance as a non-long distance relationship requires. There have been many ways to help long distance couples feel closer together via technology, such as Facebook, Skype, and Google Hangouts.

However, there haven’t been very many inventions of late that have attempted to collapse the barrier that computers cannot overcome. One invention, however, has succeeded in making it easier for long distance couples to feel closer together. What is this grand invention, you ask?

It’s a pillow. But this pillow isn’t just any pillow; this pillow has a heartbeat. And not its own heartbeat, but the heartbeat of your loved one, playing in real time.

Scottish designer Joanna Montgomery created this device, known as the Pillow Talk. It works by using a ring that measures your heartbeat, and a flat panel inside the pillow that glows and beats in sync with your partner’s heartbeat.

While some see the Pillow Talk as somewhat of an oddity, this is one of the first inventions that is aimed at bringing long distance couples closer together and feeling like they’re truly together, even though they could be hundreds of miles apart.

According to Joanna’s website, she says that Pillow Talk “is an intimate interaction between two lovers, regardless of the distance between them.” She’s won several awards and funding for her innovative and disruptive design of this product.

Her product has also been featured o several TV shows as well as an article on Gizmodo. Also, her YouTube video went viral, gaining over 400,000+ views. Joanna says that she has already had an overwhelming amount of requests for her product and that she hopes to receive enough funding through donations to begin manufacturing the product, which is why it isn’t currently available on the market.

While Pillow Talk isn’t the perfect model of a product that will help make long distance couples feel closer together, it’s the first of its kind, and is a good first step in the direction of making long distance relationships easier. This can only lead to more odd, eccentric ideas of closing the miles for those couples.

Follow Laura at @LmLundberg

The 5 W's of Google

-Elliott Kennedy

Online procrastination is the leading cause of marginal grades and failed study sessions in the United States. It leads to unfinished papers, abandoned textbooks, and partial projects. How many times have you started studying for an exam, only to magically end up browsing the wall of your Facebook page? How many times have you started writing an essay, but soon find yourself Tweeting about this f&*%! assignment instead?

And now there’s yet another way to wile away the hours.

Think back to your elementary school days, with spelling tests and model planets, and personal narratives that included the five W’s: who, what, where, when, why. And how. When you type one of these words into your web browser, a drop-down menu appears with top hits… but have you ever looked at these options? I mean, really looked at them? Some are funny. Some make you question the current state of the American education system. But all of them will make you laugh and give you welcome relief from the drudgery of homework.

Here are a few top hits from my own adventures with the Five W’s of Google.

Who:

  • Who un-followed me
  • Who wants to be a millionaire
  • Who v. whom
  • Who sampled
  • Who invented the internet

What:

  • What does my name mean
  • What is occupy wall street
  • What time is it
  • What is planking
  • What does SMH mean

Where:

  • Where’s George
  • Where is Chuck Norris
  • Where’s Waldo
  • Where them girls at
  • Where the wild things are
  • Where is my mind

When:

  • When is Halloween
  • When parents text
  • When to use a semi-colon
  • When to harvest hops
  • When to work

Why:

  • Why is the sky blue
  • Why do cats purr
  • Why are manhole covers round
  • Why do men cheat
  • Why not zoidberg

How:

  • How to tie a tie
  • How to write a cover letter
  • How to hard boil eggs
  • How much should I weigh
  • How to cook quinoa

Or better yet, how will you get back to studying now that you’re most likely redirecting the browser to try the Five W’s of Google on your own computer?

 

 

Online procrastination is the leading cause of marginal grades and failed study sessions in the United States. It leads to unfinished papers, abandoned textbooks, and partial projects. How many times have you started studying for an exam, only to magically end up browsing the wall of your Facebook page? How many times have you started writing an essay, but soon find yourself Tweeting about this f&*%! assignment instead?

And now there’s yet another way to wile away the hours.

Think back to your elementary school days, with spelling tests and model planets, and personal narratives that included the five W’s: who, what, where, when, why. And how. When you type one of these words into your web browser, a drop-down menu appears with top hits… but have you ever looked at these options? I mean, really looked at them? Some are funny. Some make you question the current state of the American education system. But all of them will make you laugh and give you welcome relief from the drudgery of homework.

Here are a few top hits from my own adventures with the Five W’s of Google.

Who:

  • Who un-followed me
  • Who wants to be a millionaire
  • Who v. whom
  • Who sampled
  • Who invented the internet

What:

  • What does my name mean
  • What is occupy wall street
  • What time is it
  • What is planking
  • What does SMH mean

Where:

  • Where’s George
  • Where is Chuck Norris
  • Where’s Waldo
  • Where them girls at
  • Where the wild things are
  • Where is my mind

When:

  • When is Halloween
  • When parents text
  • When to use a semi-colon
  • When to harvest hops
  • When to work

Why:

  • Why is the sky blue
  • Why do cats purr
  • Why are manhole covers round
  • Why do men cheat
  • Why not zoidberg
  • Why

How:

  • How to tie a tie
  • How to write a cover letter
  • How to hard boil eggs
  • How much should I weigh
  • How to cook quinoa

Or better yet, how will you get back to studying now that you’re most likely redirecting the browser to try the Five W’s of Google on your own computer?