Tag Archives: Do It Yourself

Rainy Day Arts & Crafts: Melted Crayon Art

-Jessica Ridgway

Shut the windows and bring out your flannel sheets because winter has arrived in Eugene! Some students can brave the wet and cold, but if you’re like me many of your winter weekends are spent indoors. Thankfully, I’ve stumbled upon some cheap and easy crafts projects to keep me cooped up for the season.

What You’ll Need:

Crayons, a canvas, a hot glue gun, and a hairdryer. I spent less than $8 and about two hours on this project.

Steps:

First, pick out your crayons. I chose a wide array of green and yellow.

This is an optional step, but I removed the labels from the crayons. I scavenged for my crayons and bought a ton of them from Goodwill and didn’t like that the labels didn’t match.

The next step is to glue the crayons to the canvas. For my first attempt at this project I laid a long strip of hot glue down and quickly placed the crayons down. This worked, but some of the crayons were not glued down and slid off once the canvas was tilted. I recommend gluing and melting the crayons down one-by-one for a cleaner, straighter look.

Another optional tip! Insert a picture in the background. You can leave it on (like I did) or peel it off afterwards for a cool crayon outline.

The final step is to melt the crayons. Tilt the canvas and use the hairdryer to melt them. I varied between low-to-high heats and speeds; it all depends on the look you want.

Et voila! Sophisticated crayon art for those bare walls!

Happy crafting!

The Letterpress Revival

Do It (Again) Yourself: Episode 3

[cap]A[/cap]fter the invention of Gutenberg’s printing press in the fifteenth century, letterpress printing was the primary technology used in mass communication for several centuries. Today, computers have replaced the letterpress in most areas of publication. But letterpress printing has recently seen a revival in popularity and remains part of a niche market with many independent operators doing business across the country.

The centuries-old practice is now able to blend with modern graphic design technology, creating a new appeal for a new generation of operators. Others enjoy working with their hands and interacting with physical machinery in a time where much of the work we do involves sitting in front of a screen.

Operating one of these machines is a highly developed skill that takes time and commitment. Those who have devoted themselves to this art form are able to create unique prints with a texture, a handmade feel, and a personality that cannot be found in ordinary digital printing.

Do It (Again) Yourself is a video series about people making things they used to buy and people making things that most people don’t anymore.