Category Archives: Food

Visually Oriented: The Aesthetics and Aroma of Latte Design

-Emily Fraysse

Driving toward the blur of the city lights on the Bay Bridge, I looked in my rear-view mirror to a sunrise that made Oakland and the Berkeley hills look like they were on fire. I never usually drive into San Francisco at this ungodly hour of the morning, but my mother, father, two sisters, and I all signed up to work the morning shift at Glide Memorial in the Mission District. After countless plates served of watered-down eggs and two-day-old bread, we were finally finished and exhausted. We began to wander about the Mission district, ravenous with a major lack of caffeine in my system. Bringing up the Yelp app on my iPhone, I found a good rating for a restaurant called “The Blue Fig,” so we went forth.

It was a bit of a hole-in-the wall restaurant despite the high rating on Yelp. I snatched up an order of mocha and eggs Benedict and when the food came, I was astonished. My mocha had been transformed from a typical latte to an elaborate form of art with the name of the restaurant carefully and eloquently poured in by steamed milk.

While this form of art is purely temporary, it is a worldly recognized and appreciated type of edible design. Since the early ‘80s, the action of pouring steamed milk into a shot of espresso, or latte, while creating beautiful sketches and patterns is seen as a legitimate talent. Baristas, or coffeehouse bartenders, seek creativity and elegance when creating. Their goal is not only about flaunting their talents, however. It is also about making that single cup of coffee more special, sexy, and, consequently, more delicious  The artwork ranges from floral prints, to symbols, to portraits. For more design inspiration check out this gallery.

WikiHow provides a quick guide to creating a latte floral pattern.

Excelsior Inn & Ristorante: The Not-So-Hidden Gem

-Whitney Gomes

Whiffs of sweet honey tickled my nose as I approached the front door. I found myself gliding through the garden of the Excelsior Inn; the nasal nostalgia had induced memories of my mother’s delectable homemade cornbread. The comforting memory suddenly alleviated my nerves: I hate trying new things and I’m an incredibly picky eater. The moment my leather boot met the hard wood of the foyer, I was greeted with a bright smile and a thick Italian accent. “Come, come, sit anywhere you’d like,” he said.

For the next three hours, I ate the best Italian food of my life, chatted with a former professional soccer player, toured the inn and restaurant and took photos of the local art adorning every square foot of the walls. Maybe it was the three-pound plate of pasta I devoured, or maybe the nostalgic scents prompted this realization, but I had discovered my new favorite restaurant. Having never eaten there before and living 200 feet from the building proved that some of the best places to eat are right under my nose.

Covered in vines and over 100 years old, the Excelsior Inn & Ristorante stands alone just one block from the University of Oregon. Since 1912, the building has served as a sorority and fraternity house, student housing, a dress shop, and a café. In 1972, the Excelsior Restaurant opened in the small area now known as The Bistro. By 1996, renovations were completed in order to open the Excelsior Inn––including fourteen rooms, a private dining area, a terrace dining room, and the Bistro, which features live music by local artists every weekend.

Located right off of 13th avenue and Alder Street, hundreds of students pass the restaurant every day. Do they forget the Excelsior Inn exists? After all, the gated building is quite literally hidden beneath a layer of overgrown vines and shrubs. Or is it that their starving college budgets don’t account for fine dining? Whatever it is that keeps other students out, the high-quality seasonal menu items and reasonable Bistro prices have made me an instant fan of this hidden gem.

Born in Naples, Italy, Chef and owner Maurizio Paparo proudly advocates the Slow Food Movement. He bought property in 2008 to start The Excelsior Farm: a five-acre patch in Dexter, Oregon, dedicated to growing every herb, legume, fruit and vegetable used in the restaurant (as well as his more casual Italian pizzeria in Springfield, Oregon). The Excelsior’s breakfast, Bistro, lunch, brunch, and dinner menu all feature seasonal items. During the winter they use a variety of greens such as kale and chard. This season’s Bistro menu includes three different linguine dishes, three ravioli dishes, three pizza dishes, various salads and your choice of a beef or lamb burger.

Once I had decided on an insalata Mista––a salad of mixed farm greens with creamy gorgonzola dressing––one of the chefs, Tommy Oliva, approached me asking if I would like some wheat bread he had just made from scratch. It seemed a rhetorical question to me, but he didn’t know that I would never pass up a carb-filled treat. The moment the slice met my salivating mouth, I melted.

“We make all of our bread, ravioli, pasta, and sausage in-house,” he told me. After reading and re-reading the Bistro menu, I decided to go big or go home.

Linguine all' Arrabbiata – spicy tomato sauce, homemade pesto, grilled chicken.

“I would like the Linguine all’ Arrabbiata,” I said. After the salad, I was substantially full. But then the pasta came. The noodles were unlike any noodle I’ve come across in my twenty-three years of pasta consumption. Each bite was wholesome and rich. Oliva told me they get their semolina flour (the main flour that pasta is made of) imported directly from Italy and that they are the only food establishment in town to do so. The spicy marinara was zesty and had a flavorful kick to it. The grilled chicken was seasoned to perfection and knowing that everything I ate was handmade and locally grown influenced how I felt about the pricing. Considering the cost to produce organic food, the Excelsior’s prices are reasonable.

Belly filled with pasta and ready for a nap, I thanked my server and assured her I would be back. Two days later, I brought my hesitant vegetarian roommate who lives on Kraft Mac-and-Cheese and Top Ramen noodles to the Bistro for happy hour. We ate more homemade pasta and sipped on Limoncello. I think I just became a regular.

Irish Car Bomb Cupcakes

-Whitney Gomes

I may not have a drop of Irish blood in me, but I can sure appreciate an old Irish whiskey. I particularly relish in a glass of Jameson neat or Bushmills on the rocks. An Irish friend (and fellow whiskey enthusiast) of mine created the perfect dessert recipe for our St. Patrick’s Day dinner party: Irish Car Bomb Cupcakes—an impeccable combination of delectable chocolate Ganache-filled cupcakes, Irish whiskey, and Irish cream frosting.

[An Irish Car Bomb is a popular “bomb” or “drop” shot cocktail. To make, fill a pint glass half-full with Guinness and pour 1 part Jameson Irish Whiskey in a shot glass before floating a thin layer of Bailey’s Irish Cream on top. The idea is to drop the shot into the pint glass and begin drinking once the shot glass hits the bottom.]

Shannon Flowers, the recipe master and baker, combined her personal chocolate cake recipe with two other “Irish Car Bomb Cupcake” recipes found online. The chocolate was rich, but not too rich. The cupcake was moist, but didn’t crumble in your hands. She tweaked a couple ingredients and added her own to create what our friend Mitch deemed “a life-changing cupcake” after just one bite. He’s not alone—these cupcakes blew my mind and my taste buds. Shannon’s original recipe, which is thorough yet easy to follow, exposes novice bakers to the tricks of working with a variety of ingredients. These cupcakes were a hit at the party and one of the highlights of my St. Patrick’s Day. But it doesn’t have to be St. Patrick’s Day for you to enjoy them as well!

The Cupcakes:
1 ¼ cups Guinness stout
1 cup butter, at room temperature
1 cup Dutch-process cocoa powder
2 cups cake flour (or all-purpose flour)
2 cups granulated sugar
1 ½ teaspoons baking soda
¾ teaspoons salt (only if using unsalted butter)
2 eggs
2/3 cup sour cream
2 teaspoons vanilla

Whiskey Ganache Filling:
10 ounces bittersweet chocolate chips
2/3 cup heavy cream
2 tablespoons butter, at room temperature
3-4 teaspoons Irish whiskey

Bailey’s Frosting:
2 teaspoons vanilla
2 cups unsalted butter at room temperature
5 cups powdered sugar
6-8 tablespoons Bailey’s Irish Cream

Directions:

#1. To make the cupcakes: preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Line twenty-four cupcake cups with liners. Bring the Guinness, vanilla, and butter to a simmer in a heavy, medium saucepan over medium heat. Add the cocoa powder and whisk until the mixture is smooth. Cool slightly.

#2. Whisk the flour, sugar, baking soda, and salt in a large bowl to combine. Using an electric mixer, beat the eggs and sour cream on medium speed until combined. Add the Guinness-chocolate mixture to the egg mixture and beat just to combine. Reduce the speed to low, add the flour mixture and beat briefly. Using a rubber spatula, fold the batter until completely combined. Divide the batter among the cupcake liners. Bake on a rack until a thin knife inserted into the center comes out clean—about seventeen minutes.

#3. To make the whiskey ganache filling, finely chop the chocolate and transfer it to a heatproof bowl. Heat the cream until simmering and pour it over the chocolate. Let it sit for one minute and then, using a rubber spatula, stir it from the center outward until smooth. Add the butter and whiskey and stir until combined. Let the ganache cool until thick but still soft enough to be piped.

#4 Fill the cupcakes: using a one-inch round cookie cutter, cut the centers of the cooled cupcakes, going about two-thirds of the way down. Transfer the ganache to a piping bag with a wide tip and fill the holes in each cupcake to the top.

#5 To make the Bailey’s frosting: using the whisk attachment of a stand mixer, whip the butter on medium-high speed for five minutes, scraping the sides of the bowl occasionally. Reduce the speed to medium-low and gradually add the powdered sugar until all of it is incorporated. Add the Bailey’s and vanilla and increase the speed to medium-high and whisk for another two-three minutes, or until it is light and fluffy.

#6 Using your favorite decorating tip, or an offset spatula, frost the cupcakes and decorate with sprinkles, if desired, and enjoy! Store the leftover cupcakes in an airtight container.

Don’t Worry Be Healthy: 1,3,7-Trimethylxanthine – Part II: Coffee

-Marissa Tomko

There was one dark spot in my otherwise bright and sunny morning today—and I liked it. It sucked me in as I sleepily stumbled down my stairs toward its bitter lure, welcoming the way in which its steam burned my face. Black as night, I consumed it: my morning cup (or should I say pot) of coffee.

Legend has it that coffee was first discovered in the thirteenth century by an Ethiopian goat herder named Kaldi. As the story goes, he noticed that his goats were especially energetic after eating the berries that grew on a certain type of tree. He spread the news to the nearby monastery, where monks used the coffee berries to prolong their prayer time. While the credibility of this story is questioned, the origin of coffee can certainly be traced back to Ethiopia.

Since those spunky goats, coffee has become a profitable crop grown around the world in what is called the bean belt. It lies between the Tropic of Cancer and the Tropic of Capricorn, with Hawaii being the only state in the US to grow the bitter bean. Be that as it may, the US has turned coffee into a $30 billion industry; CNBC estimates that our country drinks 400 million cups of coffee a day.

Mayo Clinic suggests that 200-300 milligrams of caffeine a day isn’t bad for you, but that drinking upwards of 500 milligrams is not healthy. To put that into more comprehensible terms, consider that a grande-sized coffee from Starbucks has 330 milligrams of caffeine. I don’t know about you, but when I do the math, I exceed my recommended dosage. In my defense though, I spread my intake throughout the day, save a recent work experience where I downed about 565 milligrams in twenty minutes. Needless to say I learned my lesson.

Coffee addicts often hear about the negative consequences of their habit: insomnia, anxiety, withdrawal headaches, and blood pressure spikes. But what about the positives? I will never forget the moment I read in a Newsweek article that claimed that women who drink four cups of coffee per day reduce their risk of becoming clinically depressed by 20 percent. Upon further investigation, I learned that those four cups also decrease my risk for liver cirrhosis by 80 percent, particularly alcoholic cirrhosis. While I drink alcohol responsibly, I interpreted this as a sign to drink my favorite caffeinated beverage with reckless abandon (thus my overdose in the workplace).

Sometimes you wake up smiling on the right side of the bed, and sometimes you don’t. In any case, I urge you to take a cue from those crazy Ethiopian goats, and kickstart your day with a fresh cup of joe.

Image by puuikibeach from http://www.flickr.com/photos/puuikibeach/3299635718/

Don't Worry Be Healthy: 1,3,7-Trimethylxanthine – Part I

-Marissa Tomko

The list of things that I love more than caffeine consists of one item: my mom. If you aren’t her, then I’m sorry if that was harsh and unexpected. I guess I’m just at a point in my life where I’m honest about my priorities.

Unlike my mom, whom I’ve relied on since, well, forever, I’ve had a dependency on caffeine since I was 17 years old. Most of my sweatshirts are dribbled with coffee stains, and you can usually bet that the straggling Red Bull cans around my house after a night out are mine. In the past four years, I think I’ve gone a total of five days without caffeine, and when I think about them, all I can recall are screaming headaches, hostile moods, and a life of reclusion under my duvet.

I’ve always been aware that my addiction is unhealthy, but even the most disapproving conversation or accidental overdose during a long day at work hasn’t even slightly swayed me into thinking that I need to change. I have a healthy diet, I exercise regularly, and I don’t smoke. What more do you want from me?!

But even after hundreds upon hundreds of daily pick-me-ups, I still don’t really know how caffeine works or what it’s actually doing to me. That’s why I’ve decided to write a short series on the caffeinated beverages in my life. I want to know where they come from, what they consist of, and the different effects they cause. Will any alarming discoveries deter me from my ritualistic drinking? Probably not, but at least I’ll be an informed citizen.

In this introductory post, I’m just going to give a quick rundown on how caffeine works: Our bodies produce energy because of a chemical called adenosine. By connecting to phosphates in the body, it creates adenosine troposphere (ATP). When that molecular bond is broken, energy is released. When adenosine connects to its receptors in the brain, there aren’t any available to create ATP, and we get tired. When we ingest caffeine (the molecule shown above), it bonds with the receptors, thus forcing adenosine to hang around with phosphates, which boosts the energy in our bodies!

That’s not all though! Caffeine also effects the pituitary gland by telling it to emit the hormones that create adrenaline. This quickens your heart beat and causes you to feel kind of crazy and energized. The pituitary gland also produces dopamine when it senses caffeine, which is the chemical that makes us feel good and happy—I’ll drink to that!

Don’t be latte for my next installment on—you guessed it—coffee!

It's All Greek To Me: How to Make Baklava

-Eleni Pappelis

Having been brought up with a Greek heritage, one thing I have come to appreciate is the great food Greeks make. Baklava is a type of honey pastry and is also a Greek delicacy that I have enjoyed my whole life. To truly call myself Greek, I baked this easy dessert!

Ingredients:

One 16 ounce  package phyllo dough
1 pound chopped nuts of your choice
1 cup butter
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 cup water
1 cup white sugar
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Butter the bottoms and sides of a 9×13 inch pan.

2. Chop nuts and toss them in with the cinnamon. Set that aside.

3. Unroll the phyllo dough. Cut the whole stack in half to fit pan. Cover the phyllo with a dampened cloth to keep it from drying out as you work. Place two sheets of dough in the pan, and butter them thoroughly. Repeat until you have 8 sheets layered. Sprinkle 2 to 3 tablespoons of nut mixture on top. Top it with two sheets of dough, butter, and nuts, layering as you go. The top layer should be about 6 to 8 sheets deep.

4. Using a sharp knife, cut the layers into diamond or square shapes all the way to the bottom of the pan. You may cut it into 4 long rows the make diagonal cuts.

5. Bake it for about 50 minutes, or until the baklava is golden and crisp.

6. Make the sauce while baklava is baking. Boil sugar and water until the sugar is melted. Add vanilla and honey. Simmer for about 20 minutes.

7. Remove the baklava from the oven and immediately spoon sauce over it. Let it cool. Serve in cupcake papers. This freezes well. Leave it uncovered as it gets soggy if it is wrapped up.

Don't Worry Be Healthy: You Are What You Eat – Unhealthy Healthy Foods

-Marissa Tomko

The day I figured out that eating healthy food actually does make you feel better was a bittersweet day for me. I missed my Kraft Mac and Cheese so much—I lived for that stuff. But how could I go back to my sketchy diet when it felt so good to eat right?

Eating healthy is key to a sustainable lifestyle, but sometimes our alleged healthy choices are actually no better for us than an order of fries or a candy overdose. I’ve found the five most commonly-mistaken “healthy” foods around so that the next time you go to grab a snack, you grab the right one.

Protein Bars

Protein is vital for the repair of muscles and is a main player in the overall health of the body. So when you’re in a hurry and running from class to the gym, a protein bar might seem like a quick and healthy way to get the protein you need, right? Wrong. Many protein bars contain as much sugar as a candy bar, and have more crazy artificial ingredients. Don’t make a habit out of snacking on this “healthy” energy boost. Instead, add more protein to your meals. Beans and brown rice make an excellent choice, as does a tasty serving of roasted chicken.

Frozen Yogurt

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me to get frozen yogurt with them, I’d be living on my own private island. Somewhere along the line, people seem to have picked up the idea that because this alternative to ice cream is often “non-fat,” it’s not bad for you. But did you ever wonder why it still tastes so good? It’s because it’s still packed with sugar. If you’re thinking of grabbing some fro-yo because you want to be healthy, don’t. Just have a normal serving of ice cream once or twice a week.

Sushi

Sushi has become a cool and trendy way to catch up with friends. Not everybody likes sushi, but if you do, it’s generally an obsession. If you’re ordering a basic roll, you’re probably treading in healthy waters—a single serving roll with salmon, rice, and seaweed is about 120 calories according to Forbes. But what about “westernized” rolls? If your go-to dish has cream cheese, mayo, or is a tempura roll, you’re looking at a 500 plus calorie dish—and none of those are coming from raw fish.

Trail Mix

It’s easy to see why trail mix is associated with health. When you think of trail mix, you think of the outdoors, hiking, and cool, organic, “granola” people. But there are several factors that lessen the healthy effects of this snack. First of all, if you aren’t eating it to energize yourself during a hike, you’re in danger of eating for the sake of eating. Snacking on trail mix is hard because you generally lose track of the serving size. Instead of eating a a handful, we eat three or four. And I don’t know about you, but any trail mix that I’ve ever enjoyed isn’t entirely made up of unsalted nuts and raisins.  It’s chalk full of sugary dried fruit, chocolate, and salty morsels. Instead of buying pre-made trail mix, try making your own with  mostly unprocessed ingredients and just a touch of the good stuff.

Reduced-Fat Peanut Butter

This “healthy alternative” to peanut butter is not going to make your PB&J better for you. People are afraid of the real thing because it’s high in fat and calories. While this is true, reduced-fat has more sugar in it than the real thing. Ever heard of everything in moderation? I’m pretty sure they made that up after peanut butter was invented. Instead of snacking on this condiment right out of the jar with a spoon (not that I’ve done that or anything…) stick to a tablespoon or two on your morning toast or a banana for an energetic start to your day!

How To: Cauliflower au Gratin

-Rache’ll Brown

I may have a slight obsession with random, healthy food. I mean, an oil and sugar-free Cake in a Cup? Spaghetti made with spaghetti squash instead of noodles? Who does this kind of stuff? Obviously me. And obviously the next logical step in my obsession is to create a healthier version of one of my favorite dishes: potatoes au gratin. So I did just that, but knowing potatoes are carb-heavy, I thought it might be best to find a substitute. And then it hit me: cauliflower au gratin. So, I scavenged Pinterest for the perfect recipe. Unfortunately, I didn’t find one. However, I did find this Martha Stewart recipe that I was able to modify quite a bit to fit my needs. You are more than welcome to stick with Martha’s original dish. I’m sure it is just as delicious . . . maybe.

Ingredients:

3 tablespoons of butter
1/3 cup of flour
2 cups of unsweetened original almond milk
I medium cauliflower
Salt, pepper, and cayenne to taste

First, over medium heat, melt the butter and stir in the flour to make a thick paste—this is called roux. It is important to continually whisk your flour until it is cooked through, which takes about one minute according to Martha. Without continual whisking, the roux can be clumpy or burn, so be prepared for an arm workout.

Next, add the two cups of almond milk, seasonings of choice, and coarsely chopped cauliflower (it doesn’t need to be tiny, but you don’t want huge chunks).

Finally, place the cauliflower mixture into a baking dish and put it into a 350 degree Fahrenheit oven for twenty minutes. I served it with a side of romaine lettuce and thought it was delicious. Initially, I wasn’t sure if the almond milk would thicken in the same way dairy milk would, but everything turned out perfectly: creamy and delicious! I’ll definitely be making this again, possibly with broccoli as well. Who says healthy can’t be yummy?

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How To: Healthy Spaghetti

-Rache’ll Brown

I love food. More importantly, I love carbs. However, my body doesn’t. When planning a meal, I try to find things that are good for me, but still taste like they aren’t. This is where spaghetti, made with spaghetti squash instead of noodles, comes into play – it’s a healthy substitute for a classic favorite.

Spaghetti squash is the perfect substitute for noodles because the stringy texture mimics the pasta just right. In the winter, like most, I enjoy comfort food – things that are filling and warm me up. Typically I eat a lot of squash (I’m obsessed with any type), and when I was younger my mom used to make spaghetti squash all the time. So I decided to give “healthy” spaghetti a try!

Ingredients:

1 medium spaghetti squash
Spaghetti sauce (I used Roasted Garlic Spaghetti Sauce from Trader Joe’s)
Meatballs or some type of ground meat (I used Meatless Meatballs, also from Trader Joe’s)

First, you need to bake your squash. This website told me to pierce holes in it and microwave for ten to twelve minutes. I stabbed that squash nearly twenty times with a knife, then with a large fork (purely because I read that it can explode and the thought of that terrified me), then microwaved it for eleven minutes. It turned out perfect, although the sizzling noises made me a little paranoid while it was cooking.

Next, take your squash out of the microwave and cut it in half. Scoop out the seeds with a spoon, then take a fork and shred the soft flesh. This might sound hard, but it really isn’t. Just make sure to hold it with an oven mitt or kitchen towel because it’s really hot and you don’t want to burn yourself. Next, microwave your meatballs and sauce according to the directions, and pour them on top of your “noodles.” Voila! It’s ready to be devoured.

Overall, I thought this meal was delicious. The taste of the spaghetti squash is pretty neutral, so it paired great with the traditional spaghetti toppings (although I wouldn’t use the same marinara again – I like garlic, but it was a bit much). A medium-sized squash made about 3 cups of “noodles,” so it could serve multiple people, or offer leftovers. I am definitely going to make this again!

Hot Meals for Cold Months

-Marissa Tomko

There are lots of reasons for not cooking every night in college. Perhaps you’re one of those overachievers who just doesn’t have any time to eat anything but canned soup. Or maybe you are lucky enough to have roommates who like to cook and always give you their leftovers. And of course, there’s always the off chance that you’re like me, and the chef gene missed you entirely. Whatever your case may be, there is a solution to your kitchen woes. With it getting colder out there, it is so nice to have hearty meals to warm you from the inside out. I present you with my three favorite meals to do just that. All three have been adapted from Allrecipes.com. The best part about them is that you can freeze them once you’ve prepared them and bake them just about any time that you wish!

Mac & Cheese

Ingredients:

12 oz package of macaroni
1 egg
2 cup smilk
2 tablespoon melted butter
2 1/2 cups shredded cheddar cheese
salt and pepper as needed

Prep:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Grease 2 quart baking pan.

Directions:

1. Cook macaroni for half the time stated on the box.

2. Whisk egg and milk, then stir in butter and cheese until thoroughly mixed.

3. Evenly distribute noodles in baking pan.

4. Pour egg/milk/cheese mixture over macaroni. Add salt and pepper to taste and stir well.

5. After pressing the covered noodles evenly into the pan, cover and freeze, or bake uncovered for about 35 minutes.

 

Enchiladas

Ingredients:

1 can cream of chicken soup
2 cups sour cream
4 cups shredded chicken
1 onion
1 can green chilies
2 cups cheddar cheese
1 package corn tortillas

Prep:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Directions:

1. Chop and caramelize the onion

2. Mix together cream of chicken soup, sour cream, chilies, 1 cup cheese, and onion in large mixing bowl.

3. Place 1 tortilla on flat surface and spoon the mixture into the middle.

4. Add chicken, and roll up.

5. Place into 13×9 baking pan, and repeat with remaining tortillas.

6. Pour leftover mixture evenly over enchiladas, and sprinkle the left over cheese on top.

7. Cover and freeze, or bake uncovered for 25 minutes.

 

Lasagna

Ingredients:

1 lb lean ground beef
1 chopped onion
1 jar spaghetti sauce
1 pint part-skim ricotta cheese
1/4 cup crated parmesan cheese
2 eggs
1 16 oz package lasagna noodles
8 oz shredded mozzarella cheese

Prep:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Directions:

1. Cook ground beef until brown.

2. Add in onions, stirring until sautéed.

3. Stir in pasta sauce.

4. In mixing bowl, combine ricotta cheese, Parmesan cheese, and eggs.

5. Spread thin layer of meat mixture on the bottom of 13X9 pan. Layer uncooked lasagna noodles, cheese mixture, and mozzarella. Repeat until ingredients are used.

6. Cover with aluminum foil. Freeze, or bake for 45 minutes. Let stand 10-15 minutes before serving.